How Does NORTHERA® (droxidopa) Work?

The exact way NORTHERA works is unknown. However, one of the effects of NORTHERA is a small and temporary increase in norepinephrine, a chemical that signals your blood vessels to tighten and helps regulate blood pressure.

A Detailed Look

Learn about norepinephrine and how NORTHERA is thought to work in the body.

How NORTHERA®(droxidopa) Works

Static text at the bottom of the screen: Please listen to the Important Safety Information, including Boxed Warning for supine hypertension, in this video.

Background music plays

Text: Stephen Parkinson’s disease with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH)

Narrator: This is Stephen.

Narrator: He has Parkinson’s disease and symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, or nOH.

Narrator: Stephen has a nervous system disorder that results in his body not having enough norepinephrine, a chemical needed to help regulate his blood pressure.

Text: Dizzy or lightheaded

Narrator: That’s why his blood pressure tends to stay low when he stands, often causing Stephen to feel dizzy and/or lightheaded.

Text:NORTHERA capsules (100 mg, 200 mg, 300 mg)

NORTHERA® (droxidopa)

Text: Capsules shown are not actual size.

Text: Take NORTHERA as prescribed by your doctor.

Text: Side Effects Headache Dizziness Nausea High blood pressure

Narrator: To treat his symptomatic nOH, Stephen’s healthcare provider prescribed NORTHERA® (droxidopa).

Narrator: His healthcare provider also discussed the potential side effects with Stephen, including the need to measure blood pressure, especially when changing doses.

Text: The exact way NORTHERA works is unknown. Do not take NORTHERA if you have a known allergy to NORTHERA or its ingredients.

Text: NORTHERA’s effectiveness beyond 2 weeks of treatment has not been established.

Narrator: The exact way Northera works is unknown, but NORTHERA is believed to increase the amount of norepinephrine in the body to help manage symptoms of dizziness, lightheadedness, or the feeling that you are about to black out when standing.

Narrator: Talk to your healthcare provider about your symptoms when standing, and whether NORTHERA may be right for you.

Use

NORTHERA (droxidopa) is a prescription medication used to reduce dizziness, lightheadedness, or the “feeling that you are about to black out” in adults who experience a significant drop in blood pressure when changing positions or standing (called symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH)) and who have one of the following:

  • Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disease that causes slowness in muscle movement as well as shaking in the hands
  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA), a Parkinson’s-like disorder with more widespread effects on the brain and body
  • Pure autonomic failure (PAF), a neurodegenerative disease that results in frequent drops in blood pressure upon standing
  • Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormones that help regulate blood pressure
  • Non-diabetic autonomic neuropathy, an inability to maintain blood pressure upon standing that can be caused by a number of rare diseases

Effectiveness beyond 2 weeks of treatment has not been established, and your doctor will decide if you should continue taking NORTHERA.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: SUPINE HYPERTENSION (this is high blood pressure while lying down)

When lying down, elevating the head and upper body lowers the risk of high blood pressure. Check your blood pressure in this position prior to starting and during NORTHERA treatment. If you experience high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about your NORTHERA treatment.

  • Do not take NORTHERA if you have a known allergy to NORTHERA or its ingredients.
  • NORTHERA may cause high blood pressure when lying down, which could lead to strokes, heart attacks, and death. To reduce this risk of supine hypertension, take your late afternoon dose of NORTHERA at least 3 hours before going to bed.
  • Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially life-threatening side effect reported with NORTHERA. Call your doctor right away and go to the nearest emergency room if you develop these signs and symptoms: high fever, stiff muscles, movements that you cannot control, confusion or problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeats, or increased sweating. NORTHERA should be stopped immediately if NMS is diagnosed.
  • If you have coronary artery disease, irregular heartbeat, or heart failure, NORTHERA may worsen the symptoms of these disorders. Call your doctor if your symptoms become worse.
  • NORTHERA may cause allergic reactions. Stop taking NORTHERA and contact your doctor right away, or go to the nearest emergency room if you experience any signs or symptoms of an allergic reaction such as: fast heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, swelling, trouble breathing, hives, or rash. NORTHERA contains tartrazine (FD&C Yellow No. 5), which may also cause an allergic reaction, especially if you have had a reaction to aspirin.
  • The most common side effects with NORTHERA are headache, dizziness, nausea, and high blood pressure.
  • Taking NORTHERA with other medications may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if you take prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements.
  • You should not breastfeed during treatment with NORTHERA.
  • If you plan to become or are currently pregnant, talk to your doctor as it is not known if NORTHERA could harm your unborn baby.
  • Take NORTHERA the same way each time, either with or without food.
  • If you miss a dose of NORTHERA, take your next dose at the regularly scheduled time. Do not double the dose.

For more information, please see the full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning for supine hypertension.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Close the transcript

Use

NORTHERA (droxidopa) is a prescription medication used to reduce dizziness, lightheadedness, or the “feeling that you are about to black out” in adults who experience a significant drop in blood pressure when changing positions or standing (called symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH)) and who have one of the following:

  • Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disease that causes slowness in muscle movement as well as shaking in the hands
  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA), a Parkinson’s-like disorder with more widespread effects on the brain and body
  • Pure autonomic failure (PAF), a neurodegenerative disease that results in frequent drops in blood pressure upon standing
  • Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormones that help regulate blood pressure
  • Non-diabetic autonomic neuropathy, an inability to maintain blood pressure upon standing that can be caused by a number of rare diseases

Effectiveness beyond 2 weeks of treatment has not been established, and your doctor will decide if you should continue taking NORTHERA.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: SUPINE HYPERTENSION (this is high blood pressure while lying down)

When lying down, elevating the head and upper body lowers the risk of high blood pressure. Check your blood pressure in this position prior to starting and during NORTHERA treatment. If you experience high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about your NORTHERA treatment.

  • Do not take NORTHERA if you have a known allergy to NORTHERA or its ingredients.
  • NORTHERA may cause high blood pressure when lying down, which could lead to strokes, heart attacks, and death. To reduce this risk of supine hypertension, take your late afternoon dose of NORTHERA at least 3 hours before going to bed.
  • Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially life-threatening side effect reported with NORTHERA. Call your doctor right away and go to the nearest emergency room if you develop these signs and symptoms: high fever, stiff muscles, movements that you cannot control, confusion or problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeats, or increased sweating. NORTHERA should be stopped immediately if NMS is diagnosed.
  • If you have coronary artery disease, irregular heartbeat, or heart failure, NORTHERA may worsen the symptoms of these disorders. Call your doctor if your symptoms become worse.
  • NORTHERA may cause allergic reactions. Stop taking NORTHERA and contact your doctor right away, or go to the nearest emergency room if you experience any signs or symptoms of an allergic reaction such as: fast heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, swelling, trouble breathing, hives, or rash. NORTHERA contains tartrazine (FD&C Yellow No. 5), which may also cause an allergic reaction, especially if you have had a reaction to aspirin.
  • The most common side effects with NORTHERA are headache, dizziness, nausea, and high blood pressure.
  • Taking NORTHERA with other medications may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if you take prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements.
  • You should not breastfeed during treatment with NORTHERA.
  • If you plan to become or are currently pregnant, talk to your doctor as it is not known if NORTHERA could harm your unborn baby.
  • Take NORTHERA the same way each time, either with or without food.
  • If you miss a dose of NORTHERA, take your next dose at the regularly scheduled time. Do not double the dose.

For more information, please see the full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning for supine hypertension.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please see Important Safety Information, including Boxed Warning for supine hypertension.

For more information, see the full Prescribing Information.

Use

NORTHERA (droxidopa) is a prescription medication used to reduce dizziness, lightheadedness, or the “feeling that you are about to black out” in adults who experience a significant drop in blood pressure when changing positions or standing (called symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH)) and who have one of the following:

  • Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disease that causes slowness in muscle movement as well as shaking in the hands
  • Multiple system atrophy (MSA), a Parkinson’s-like disorder with more widespread effects on the brain and body
  • Pure autonomic failure (PAF), a neurodegenerative disease that results in frequent drops in blood pressure upon standing
  • Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency, a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormones that help regulate blood pressure
  • Non-diabetic autonomic neuropathy, an inability to maintain blood pressure upon standing that can be caused by a number of rare diseases

Effectiveness beyond 2 weeks of treatment has not been established, and your doctor will decide if you should continue taking NORTHERA.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: SUPINE HYPERTENSION (this is high blood pressure while lying down)

When lying down, elevating the head and upper body lowers the risk of high blood pressure. Check your blood pressure in this position prior to starting and during NORTHERA treatment. If you experience high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about your NORTHERA treatment.

  • Do not take NORTHERA if you have a known allergy to NORTHERA or its ingredients.
  • NORTHERA may cause high blood pressure when lying down, which could lead to strokes, heart attacks, and death. To reduce this risk of supine hypertension, take your late afternoon dose of NORTHERA at least 3 hours before going to bed.
  • Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) is a rare but potentially life-threatening side effect reported with NORTHERA. Call your doctor right away and go to the nearest emergency room if you develop these signs and symptoms: high fever, stiff muscles, movements that you cannot control, confusion or problems thinking, very fast or uneven heartbeats, or increased sweating. NORTHERA should be stopped immediately if NMS is diagnosed.
  • If you have coronary artery disease, irregular heartbeat, or heart failure, NORTHERA may worsen the symptoms of these disorders. Call your doctor if your symptoms become worse.
  • NORTHERA may cause allergic reactions. Stop taking NORTHERA and contact your doctor right away, or go to the nearest emergency room if you experience any signs or symptoms of an allergic reaction such as: fast heartbeat, nausea, vomiting, swelling, trouble breathing, hives, or rash. NORTHERA contains tartrazine (FD&C Yellow No. 5), which may also cause an allergic reaction, especially if you have had a reaction to aspirin.
  • The most common side effects with NORTHERA are headache, dizziness, nausea, and high blood pressure.
  • Taking NORTHERA with other medications may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if you take prescription or over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, or herbal supplements.
  • You should not breastfeed during treatment with NORTHERA.
  • If you plan to become or are currently pregnant, talk to your doctor as it is not known if NORTHERA could harm your unborn baby.
  • Take NORTHERA the same way each time, either with or without food.
  • If you miss a dose of NORTHERA, take your next dose at the regularly scheduled time. Do not double the dose.

For more information, please see the full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning for supine hypertension.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.